Why doing a Science degree is not ‘risky’.

By Dr. Mahbub Sarkar, Dr. Chris Thompson & Prof. Tina Overton

The recent Australian Graduate Survey (AGS) reported that 51 per cent of the science graduates found full-time work within four months after completing their course, 17 percentage points below the national average. Based on this single data point, Andrew Norton of the Grattan Institute claimed that enrolling in science degrees is “risky”. He commented,

“If people think doing a Bachelor in Science will give them skills that are highly valued in the labour market then they should probably look at something else.”

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‘The Martian (2015)’ #MotivationMonday

Check out this awesome concept art from The Martian – originally shared via http://bit.ly/TheRaceToSpace.

Written by Jenny

Started off as just journal entries on Andy Weir’s personal blog (super old school), ‘The Martian’ turned into a mega-hit novel. Andy’s passion for science shines through the story with the realism of science and technologies in ‘The Martian’.  The movie adaption by Ridley Scott to be become one of the science fiction movies where the movie did the book justice.  

The story follows a witty, clever astronaut, Mark Watney, in his quest to survive the inhospitable Martian life and return to Earth. The movie is much more than just an adventure as his humour and charm keeps you feel invested in the story, even through the most serious and deadly of times. This is true for both the book and the movie.

The science and technologies in the movie and film may not be perfect but it’s as close to real technologies as movies get. Check out 9 real NASA Technologies in ‘The Martian’ here 

***Be warned! There may be some spoilers in this post, continue reading at your own discretion.***

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Bioinformatics with Professor Ross Coppel

By Carl Wang, Science student

As a student interested in the medical sciences I am always torn between medicine and research. Some days I gather the resolve to push the boundaries of human knowledge, whilst other days I endeavour to ease the burden of suffering one patient at a time.

In my conflict, I decided to talk to someone who has been through both. Enter Professor Ross Coppel, a man who, starting with an MBBS, has branched out into fields such as microbiology, bioinformatics, and molecular biology. He is currently the Deputy Dean and Director of Research in the Faculty of Medicine, Nursing, and Health Sciences.

Ross’s qualifications and accolades are as varied and plentiful as the man’s interests in the fields that make up biomedical research, and an expanded biography may be found at http://www.med.monash.edu.au/microbiology/staff/coppel.html

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Research?

By Jesse Givens-Lamb

RESEARCH?

Not a word that I would ever anticipated myself ever really getting involved with.

Well, to be honest I used to be interested in medical research but then realised I wasn’t as passionate about the medical field as I thought I was … and after only a brief period of time I understood (to some degree) what “actual” research meant.

Research was not for me.

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Science cannot solve all our problems.

Author: Michelle (Yi-Xuan) Fu

Science cannot solve all our problems.

 

By studying science and by allocating billions of dollars into research, we hope to expand and organise our understanding of the universe, providing us testable explanations of past and current events and assisting in predicting and preparing for our future. But there is a huge difference between knowing something and acting on it.

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We need your honest opinion

To keep The Scapegoat going, we need your help!

We have been running our weekly newsletter and recently updated blog/website since 2014. Our publication is for Science students by Science students. We are looking for your honest opinions about The Scapegoat so we can improve and do our best to give you what you want, with the aim to be the one-stop-shop for all your needs as a Monash Science student.

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