Student Life Management – Time

Time Management

Aidan Matthews  @aidanjrmatthews

Time management is the essence of Life Management. It allows for the utilisation of time for the maximum productivity and the successful completion of tasks and goals. Developing techniques for your time as a student means you can have a social life, stay healthy, eat food, work a job and study a whole degree all at the same time. People have better time management skills than believed, but quite often struggle with the self-discipline and succumb to temptations.

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Tackling exam mind blanks with six simple tips

Written by Christina Nelson

#FeelingPrepared

It is that time of semester again … the mid-semester slump.

But there is good news as we are now past the halfway point!

You may have already had your mid-semester tests, or you have them to look *forward* to after the break. Regardless, we want to tackle those end-of-semester exams with confidence – and may all the late nights be worth it.

For many, exams are a headache and the thought of them makes you feel sick in your stomach.

Perhaps you have experienced the feeling where your mind freezes during an exam? Or where you just cannot recall why DNA is described as a double helix?

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Welcome to Student Life Management

 

Week 1

Welcome to Student Life Management

Aidan Matthews 5. April 2018   @aidanjrmatthews

Life as a Student is incredible, challenging, enriching, stressful and so much more. Each year of your studies bringing an increase in pressure and challenge, the constant development of skills, methods and ideas allows for the continual development and achievement of goals. This series of articles produced in conjunction with the Scapegoat Science Newsletter aim to provide you with tools to develop skills in Student Life Management. With the ever-present threat of mid-semester exams, essays, reports, group presentations and quizzes, this series will offer quick snapshots to challenge your ideas, habits, and methods with the objective of developing your Student Life Management.

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Sleepy hygiene #MotivationMonday

Created by Dooder - Freepik.com

Restless nights, followed by tiring mornings and always feeling like you can never catch enough sleep?

Like how we have habits to keep our teeth clean and our studies done, we have habits that affect our sleep.

Sleep hygiene describes good sleep habits. Here are some advice to help you get a good night’s sleep from a student. Most of these are common sense but the hustle and bustle of the modern and uni life makes most of us neglect some of our common senses and self-care.

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‘Career Goat’ – Careers Month

Hi All,

I would like to extend a warm welcome to all our new and returning students. I hope that you are starting to settle in and get into the swing of uni life.

As the Careers Education Consultant (Science) I would like to draw your attention to all the workshops and seminars that are available to help you on your career journey.

This month is ‘Careers Month’.

This is a month of career events, seminars, workshops, panels, forums and more!

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English Connect

Free sessions for anyone who needs help with English!

Peer Support is a way to boost your written or spoken academic English one-on-one. It runs Week 3 – 13, Monday to Friday 11am – 3pm in Career Connect (Ground Floor, Campus Centre). No bookings required!

Let’s Chat is a fun way of learning spoken English. It covers conversation, including Australian slang and accents and is a great way to make friends. Register from July 11!

For information, check out the website at https://www.monash.edu/students/conversational-english/ or contact english.connect@monash.edu

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Study tips from a serial procrastinator….

Here are some more tips to get you studying hardersmarter.

1. Use a strange (but still legible) font for your study notes.

You will have to put more effort into reading them therefore you are less likely to skim and more likely to retain what you’ve read.

2. Teach what you have studied.

You are 50% more likely to remember something that you’ve said as opposed to have read. Take advantage of this by teaching a friend or family member who is new to the topic. You will soon realise what you don’t understand and questions they have can test your knowledge.

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