Dr. Keenan’s Guide to Dealing with Depression

Depression & Addiction:
According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA), approximately one in five Americans suffering with a mood disorder like depression is also battling with alcohol addiction or some other type of chronic substance abuse.

Conversely, about 20 percent of all individuals addicted to alcohol or drugs also experience some level of depression, anxiety, or other mood-related disorder.

On their own, these issues can feel absolutely debilitating and dramatically lower your quality of life. But when they’re combined, the consequences can actually be fatal.

What is it about these two issues that makes them happen in unison? Dr. Keenan and Dr. Cohen explore the answers to that question and more in the article: https://www.inpatientdrugrehab.org/depression/


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A Real Jurassic Park? Amber in Myanmar


A real Jurassic Park? Amber in Myanmar.

by Christina Nelson

The trilogy, Jurassic Park, and now the fourth instalment, Jurassic World, is a stroke of cinematic genius. It is probably safe to say that many share this view given the films have grossed in excess of US$1 billion dollars. Simply, it is a type of movie that you can watch over and over again and never get bored. It is a type of movie that you can rug up to on a Friday night, whilst your friends are drinking their twenties away, and you remain at home with your Ben and Jerry’s cookie and cream ice-cream. The films make you challenge what seemingly is the impossible. Even when watching Jurassic Park today, I still catch myself thinking ‘yep this could totally happen’ (even though as a scientist you should always question). The films capture the balance between an absolute lack of foresight with occasional pearls of wisdom (i.e. Ian Malcolm) and theatrical (albeit theoretically incorrect) movie science. The question that I really want to ask: can Jurassic Park really happen?


Photography by E. Penalver via Nature Communications.


Well, several recent archaeological finds, have all originated from one remarkable site: the amber mines of northern Myanmar’s Hukawng Valley. The recent discoveries include a new species of insect, that looks more like E.T., an intact feathered tail of a small carnivorous dinosaur, and a nearly complete 99 million-year-old baby bird. Another remarkable amber discovery was a tick fossilized from the Dominican Republic that may have fed on dinosaurs. This discovery seems to have been written for a plot straight out of one of Spielberg’s movies. Like the movie, could the tick make for the cloning of dinosaurs possible?

Since amber specimens are fossils, this means that DNA will not be preserved well. In our case, we want dinosaur (‘dino’) DNA. In fact, scientists calculated that DNA has a half-life of 521 years. This means that after 521 years, half of the bonds which link DNA would have decayed, and then in another 521 years another half, and so on. This is also increased by other factors, like the actual conditions of fossilization, such as, excessive dehydration and the dynamic changes in temperature over time. Now, this (sadly) means that after approximately 1.5 million years the sequence of DNA would be virtually unreadable and after 6.8 million years, all bonds would no longer exist, meaning that our dino DNA would not be viable to use in a cloning experiment. Of course, even if there was some dino DNA left, we would then need to replace the ‘missing’ DNA with that of an acceptable donor cell of an animal that scientists select to clone.

This means (unfortunately?) I do not think that we should be expecting a real life Jurassic Park-type reanimation any time soon. Personally, I do not fancy a Tyrannosaurus rex roaming around New York city. We, whether that be scientists or lawyers ectara, do not have some sort of ‘God-complex’ and Ian Malcolm is correct ‘life finds a way’. We simply cannot resolve nature’s resistance to control. So, for now, these amber finds are just simply fascinating. Let’s leave it at that.



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Science Student Quicklinks


Here are some important links that you will need throughout the course of your journey as a Science Undergrad.

Monash Science Undergraduate Degree Resources:

Networking & News:

  • Monash Science LinkedIn can connect you with Alumni, Academics, other Staff and Students. You will need to create a LinkedIn profile to view all of these connections.
  • Monash Science Facebook page keeps you up to date with current Monash Science related News, Events, Study & Job opportunities.
  • Monash SSLL Vollie Facebook page hosts study groups for students across the year levels.

Job & Internship Opportunities:

  • List of Science career options based on the School of Sciences.
  • Career Gateway – Monash student portal that allows you to search for volunteering positions, part-time, casual & full-time jobs in any area (from being an umpire for children’s sports to being a maths tutor).
  • Professional bodies in your areas of interest also run events, so check out Career Connect for the possible events they host. Career Connect also will check your application; all you have to do is register on Career Gateway for one of their many workshops or 1-on-1 sessions.

Graduate Opportunities:


Current events and updates are made on our Careers tab, start your journey to success now!

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KPMG China & HK Graduate Program


KPMG is a global network of member firms with 189,000 people across a range of disciplines worldwide, including around 10,000 partners and staff across 16 cities in China. They provide audit, tax and advisory services to many of the world’s foremost companies. Their client focus, commitment to excellence, global mindset and unparalleled delivery build long standing partnerships based on trust and integrity, which are at the core of their business and international reputation.

KPMG’s graduate recruitment season has just begun and they are targeting STEM students who are planning on returning to China or HK, this year in order to achieve a balanced and diverse workforce.

Hop onto:


for more information!


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