Cancer Council Victoria’s 2020/21 Summer Vacation Studentship: Applications open 10th Aug!

Applications for Cancer Council Victoria’s 2020/21 Summer Vacation Studentships open at 9am on Monday 10 August 2020.

Studentships are offered to undergraduate students enrolled in relevant disciplines at any Victorian University.  Students are not eligible to apply after completing their final year, except for 3rd year science students who are proceeding to the fourth year of an honours degree.

Applicants need to source a studentship project that is part of a cancer research program being conducted at a Victorian university or research organisation. Clinical and allied health placements are also encouraged.

All information and application forms can be found on our website: http://www.cancervic.org.au/research/biomedical/research_sum_vacation_studentships

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Game day instructions for Virtual Scavenger Hunt

Take a break from online study and have some fun in this online challenge that you can play from anywhere. This virtual scavenger hunt will allow all students to come together, have some fun and connect as a student group by completing a series of small fun challenges to earn points using whatever you have lying around!

Play for 20 minutes from noon on Tuesday 14th April or Friday 17th April – or both! 

UPDATE: The code word for Friday is ‘Ants’

Scan the QR code below to take part in the game!

We’ve dropped a reminder into your calendar which will be updated with the game instructions on the day (no head starts allowed!) so all you need to do is download the ‘Go Team’ app to your mobile or device from the Appstore or Google play and be ready to play!
Session champions will win a $250 Visa gift card #Letsdothis

Your game goes live at 12noon – be ready when it does.

The instructions are below, or you can watch this YouTube clip.

Step 1: Download the App ‘Go Team’ by Catalyst Global from the Appstore or Google play   

Step 2: Click the QR scanner icon in the top right corner from 12pm when your session goes live.

Step 3: Select ‘Download Game’. If you are having trouble downloading, you may need to delete some videos or photos on your device to create space.

Step 4: Select ‘Start’

Step 5: Enter your ‘Name’ (no emojis).

IMPORTANT: Remember this name if you are playing Friday’s game. It must be exactly the same to be in the running for the overall winner.

Step 6: Once all your icon challenges appear, you may need to use two fingers to zoom in or out depending on your device to see them all.

Step 7: Click on a Challenge Circle Icon and then the information icon to see a quick overview of the challenge. If you want to undertake the challenge click the launch button and follow the instructions to play.

Some things to note:

  • There are 10 different categories to choose from – these are the icons on the left.
  • The challenges requiring a Photo or Video are taken through the Go Remote App. For these challenges select ‘Take Photo’ or ‘Take Video’ and then you must scroll down and click ‘Submit’ to receive points.
  • If you have any questions, you can chat to the game administrator through the icon in the top left corner. Just Click the message function, the Monash Game, then ‘Controller’
  • Make sure you have your sound turned on on both your phone and in the App – through the settings icon.
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Scapegoat Week 1 Edition

 

Welcome to 2020, fellow science students! We hope you’ve all had a great holiday and are recharged for the semester ahead. We understand that the changes to semester due to COVID-19 can be confusing, but we have plenty of resources available to help you through it. We also have some fantastic events coming up where you can get to know the science lounge and make some new friends!

Find out about all the events happening during WELCOME WEEK 16-20 March, including the biggest campus event in Monash University’s history: O-Fest: After Dark! Get tips on how to get around once you’re on campus, and the chance to get a head start on finding your tribe at Monash. Click here to find out more.

The SSLL will be organising a free pancake breakfast in Week 3 (23rd -27th March) to welcome all science students back to campus. We’ll be providing breakfast from 9:00am – 11:00am on Monday 23rd, Wednesday 25th and Friday 27th so come and join us in the SSLL at 14 Rainforest Walk. Be sure to bring your own mug to enjoy free tea and coffee!

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Have your say! Bachelor of Science Course Reviews

The Faculty of Science is currently conducting a course review on the Bachelor of Science and all its associated courses.

The forum will cover questions and discussion on course experience, core units and teaching as well as what you plan to do after your studies. It is your chance to give feedback on your experience in the Bachelor of Science so far. As this is an official review, there is no payment made for your time.

We are looking for students enrolled in the Bachelor of Science (this includes students enrolled in a Science double degree) from each School to participate in these forums.

School of Chemistry

Monday 17 February

10.00 – 11.30am – students who were in first year in 2019 and completed CHM1011/CHM1051 and CHM1022/CHM1052

12.30 – 2.00pm – students who are second or third year who have/are completing a Chemistry major/extended major

Register to attend the Chemistry student forum

 

School of Mathematics

Tuesday 18 February

9.30 – 11.00am – students who were in first year in 2019 and completed at least two of SCI1020, STA1010, MTH1020, MTH1030 or MTH1035, MAT1830

11.00am – 12.30pm – students who are second or third year who have/are completing a Mathematics major/extended major (any)

Register to attend the Mathematics student forum

Faculty of Information Technology

Tuesday 18 February

1.00 – 2.30pm – students who were in first year in 2019 and completed FIT1045 and FIT1008

2.30 – 4.00pm – students who are in second or third year who have/are completing a Computational science major/extended major

Register to attend the IT student forum

School of Earth, Atmosphere and Environment

Wednesday 19 February

9.30 – 11.00am – students who were in first year in 2019 and completed either EAE1011 and EAE1022 or ATS1310 and EAE1022

11.00am – 12.30pm – students who are in second or third year who have/are completing a major/extended major in the School of Earth, Atmosphere and Environment

Register to attend the EAE student forum

School of Biomedical Sciences

Wednesday 19 February

2.30 – 4.00pm – students who are in second or third year who have/are completing a major/extended major within the School of Biomedical Sciences e.g. Physiology, Immunology, Microbiology etc.

Register to attend the Biomed student forum

School of Physics and Astronomy

Thursday 20 February

10.00 – 11.30am – students who were in first year in 2019 and completed a level one Physics sequence PHS1011 and PHS1022, PHS1031 and PHS1002 or PHS1001 and PHS1002

12.30 – 2.00pm – students who are in second or third year who have/are completing a Physics or Astrophysics major/extended major

Register to attend the Physics and Astronomy student forum

School of Biological Sciences

Friday 21 February

10.00 – 11.30am – students who were in first year in 2019 and completed either BIO1011 and BIO1022 or BIO1011 and BIO1042

12.30 – 2.00pm – students who are in second or third year who have/are completing a major within the School of Biological Sciences

Register to attend the Biological Sciences student forum

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Let’s Study for Exams Together #MotivationMonday

Written by Jenny

It’s the last week of formal classes for the year! Congratulations on making it this far with us! Your commitment and hard work in your studies should be commended.

With only one last push before the home run for the year, we want to make sure that you have the support and tools you need to prepare for your exams because we believe in you. 

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Become a Science Peer Mentor!

SPMP 2019 Logo

The Science Peer Mentor program is back! Now in its 8th year, the program has been revitalised by a new structure and hopes to be bigger and better than ever!

Senior Student Mentors look after a group of new first year Science Students and help them to transition into university, giving their time and experience to support these students. This year, a greater number and more diverse array of leadership positions are also available. A new leadership team will seek to develop events, support mentors and ensure the program is both helpful for mentees and fun for mentors.

The new program includes new volunteer positions:

  • Event Managers: Develop and run events, as well as marketing and ensuring the program runs smoothly.
  • Team Leaders: Oversee large teams of mentors in subgroups of the program such as communications, evaluations and informal events.

Want to become a mentor? Apply here.

Want to be an Event Manager? Apply here. 

Want to do a little bit more but don’t have time to be an Event Manager? First, apply to be a mentor. Then send an email to Taryn.Clydesdale@monash.edu for expressing your interest in leadership and previous leadership experience.

Applications for mentors close on the 1st of October, and the 14th of September for leadership roles.

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Come and Hear about Honours in Science

Get a chance to speak to current Honours coordinators and students on Thursday, the 16th of August, at the Honours in Science Information Session.

Honours offers the unique opportunity for students to stretch their legs with a research project of their own design. For those pursuing higher study, Honours gives a chance to develop yourself for a research background. It will give you an excellent foundation for further academic pursuits. Similarly, Honours gives students an employability edge as it serves to further their communication, project management and problem-solving skills.

Honours research projects are available for all Science majors.

To register your attendance, click on this link.

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Dr. Keenan’s Guide to Dealing with Depression

Depression & Addiction:
According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA), approximately one in five Americans suffering with a mood disorder like depression is also battling with alcohol addiction or some other type of chronic substance abuse.

Conversely, about 20 percent of all individuals addicted to alcohol or drugs also experience some level of depression, anxiety, or other mood-related disorder.

On their own, these issues can feel absolutely debilitating and dramatically lower your quality of life. But when they’re combined, the consequences can actually be fatal.

What is it about these two issues that makes them happen in unison? Dr. Keenan and Dr. Cohen explore the answers to that question and more in the article: https://www.inpatientdrugrehab.org/depression/

 

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A Real Jurassic Park? Amber in Myanmar

 

A real Jurassic Park? Amber in Myanmar.

by Christina Nelson

 

The trilogy, Jurassic Park, and now the fourth instalment, Jurassic World, is a stroke of cinematic genius. It is probably safe to say that many share this view given the films have grossed in excess of US$1 billion dollars. Simply, it is a type of movie that you can watch over and over again and never get bored. It is a type of movie that you can rug up to on a Friday night, whilst your friends are drinking their twenties away, and you remain at home with your Ben and Jerry’s cookie and cream ice-cream. The films make you challenge what seemingly is the impossible. Even when watching Jurassic Park today, I still catch myself thinking ‘yep this could totally happen’ (even though as a scientist you should always question). The films capture the balance between an absolute lack of foresight with occasional pearls of wisdom (i.e. Ian Malcolm) and theatrical (albeit theoretically incorrect) movie science. The question that I really want to ask: can Jurassic Park really happen?

 

Photography by E. Penalver via Nature Communications.

 

Well, several recent archaeological finds, have all originated from one remarkable site: the amber mines of northern Myanmar’s Hukawng Valley. The recent discoveries include a new species of insect, that looks more like E.T., an intact feathered tail of a small carnivorous dinosaur, and a nearly complete 99 million-year-old baby bird. Another remarkable amber discovery was a tick fossilized from the Dominican Republic that may have fed on dinosaurs. This discovery seems to have been written for a plot straight out of one of Spielberg’s movies. Like the movie, could the tick make for the cloning of dinosaurs possible?

Since amber specimens are fossils, this means that DNA will not be preserved well. In our case, we want dinosaur (‘dino’) DNA. In fact, scientists calculated that DNA has a half-life of 521 years. This means that after 521 years, half of the bonds which link DNA would have decayed, and then in another 521 years another half, and so on. This is also increased by other factors, like the actual conditions of fossilization, such as, excessive dehydration and the dynamic changes in temperature over time. Now, this (sadly) means that after approximately 1.5 million years the sequence of DNA would be virtually unreadable and after 6.8 million years, all bonds would no longer exist, meaning that our dino DNA would not be viable to use in a cloning experiment. Of course, even if there was some dino DNA left, we would then need to replace the ‘missing’ DNA with that of an acceptable donor cell of an animal that scientists select to clone.

This means (unfortunately?) I do not think that we should be expecting a real life Jurassic Park-type reanimation any time soon. Personally, I do not fancy a Tyrannosaurus rex roaming around New York city. We, whether that be scientists or lawyers ectara, do not have some sort of ‘God-complex’ and Ian Malcolm is correct ‘life finds a way’. We simply cannot resolve nature’s resistance to control. So, for now, these amber finds are just simply fascinating. Let’s leave it at that.

 

 

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